Kiki Kokí: La Leyenda Encantada del Coquí (Kiki Kokí: The Enchanted Legend of the Coquí Frog) (Spanish Edition)
Kiki Kokí: La Leyenda Encantada del Coquí (Kiki Kokí: The Enchanted Legend of the Coquí Frog) (Spanish Edition)
Kiki Kokí: La Leyenda Encantada del Coquí (Kiki Kokí: The Enchanted Legend of the Coquí Frog) (Spanish Edition)
Roaring Brook Press

Kiki Kokí: La Leyenda Encantada del Coquí (Kiki Kokí: The Enchanted Legend of the Coquí Frog) (Spanish Edition)

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Author: Rodríguez, Ed

Binding: Hardcover

Number Of Pages: 40

Publisher: Roaring Brook Press

Release Date: 14-04-2015

Details: Product Description Un cuento mágico en español, Kiki Koki narra la historia de un Indio Taino pequeño quien es muy vago para ayudar a su tribu en la preparación del Festival de la Luna. Para castigar a Kiki Koki, la Diosa de la Luna lo convierte en un una rana de árbol. Para regresar a su forma humana, el tendrá que rescatar sus nuevos amigos rana de los piratas peligrosos. En el proceso, Kiki Koki aprenderá que la amistad conlleva valentía, dedicación, y trabajo duro. A los niños y las niñas les encantara este cuento divertido con ilustraciones vibrantes, mensaje conmovedor y héroe adorable. From School Library Journal K-Gr 2—In this Spanish-language picture book, Rodriguez presents one of the legends surrounding the unofficial symbol of Puerto Rico: the coquí. A Taíno boy, Kiki Kokí, does not like doing any work around his village. As a consequence, he is banned from attending the Moon Festival. A torrential rain sweeps the boy away and nearly drowns him until two frogs save his life. When discovering that the moon goddess has turned him into a little golden frog, Kokí is overcome with sadness. The lizard witch, Mona, tells him that he must remain in "Frogville" (la villa de las ranas) and do good deeds for 30 days before he can ask the goddess to change him back into a boy. Rodriguez takes artistic license with his full-color, Disney-like cartoon illustrations and cherry-picks period dress and architecture from the entire span of post-conquest Puerto Rican history. The frogs are depicted wearing everything from top hats to guayabera shirts, both of which were nonexistent in the 1500s. In addition, town life features snow-cone pushcarts and a SpongeBob-inspired pineapple house. Aside from this revoltijo (medley) of disparate details, the story and illustrations are entertaining and even introduce a motley gang of pirates who want to frognap and enslave all of Kokí's amphibian friends. Kokí saves the day and learns a lesson about the importance of cooperation. VERDICT Young readers will enjoy this Taíno Indian origin myth.—Mary Margaret Mercado, Pima County Public Library, Tucson, AZ Review “In this Spanish-language picture book, Rodriguez presents one of the legends surrounding the unofficial symbol of Puerto Rico: the coquí. A Taíno boy, Kiki Kokí, does not like doing any work around his village. As a consequence, he is banned from attending the Moon Festival. A torrential rain sweeps the boy away and nearly drowns him until two frogs save his life. When discovering that the moon goddess has turned him into a little golden frog, Kokí is overcome with sadness. The lizard witch, Mona, tells him that he must remain in "Frogville" (la villa de las ranas) and do good deeds for 30 days before he can ask the goddess to change him back into a boy. Rodriguez takes artistic license with his full-color, Disney-like cartoon illustrations and cherry-picks period dress and architecture from the entire span of post-conquest Puerto Rican history. The frogs are depicted wearing everything from top hats to guayabera shirts, both of which were nonexistent in the 1500s. In addition, town life features snow-cone pushcarts and a SpongeBob-inspired pineapple house. Aside from this revoltijo (medley) of disparate details, the story and illustrations are entertaining and even introduce a motley gang of pirates who want to frognap and enslave all of Kokí's amphibian friends. Kokí saves the day and learns a lesson about the importance of cooperation. VERDICT: Young readers will enjoy this Taíno Indian origin myth.” ― School Library Journal About the Author Ed Rodriguez was born and raised in Brooklyn, New York. As a child he visited his grandparents in Puerto Rico and like most children was taken by the island's natural beauty and intrigued by the singing coquí frog. After a family trip with his own children, Ed was inspired to create Kiki Kokí. It is Ed's hope that children all over the world are introduced to the coquí frog through his book and le

Package Dimensions: 10.1 x 10.1 x 0.5 inches

Languages: Spanish